Health Myths and Children!

Being Overweight is Genetic.
There are very few inherited conditions that cause a person to be overweight. If an entire family is overweight, it’s most likely that only the habits have been passed down through generations.

I’m not Athletic.
Experts suggest that a half-hour walk everyday is an effective part of getting fit. Think about getting your blood pumping.

Talking About Weight Encourages Eating Disorders.
Talking about the importance of physical health is important and fitness experts recommend being positive with your kids and talk about healthy lifestyles. The best way is to teach by example, and to put the emphasis on exercise – and not about food. Additionally, don’t let food be a reward or punishment. Reward with activities and more time together.

It’s Just Baby Fat.
If your child is obese before the age of six, the probability increases that he or she will be obese as an adult. Consult with your pediatrician about what a healthy height-weight ratio is, and if necessary, talk about sensible ways to take off weight. There are no quick fixes, just take it one day at a time.

Kids Should Not Snack Between Meals.
Nibbling on healthy items such as fruit or nuts can help prevent overeating during meal times. Play the portion-control game and learn more about nutrition at.

Limit Television/Computer Time.
Watching television and using the computer is a sedentary activity, alternate screen time with equal amounts of healthy exercise and encourage activities that include family and friends.

Give Your Kids Household Chores.
An activity that requires active movement and encourages teamwork not only gives kids the task of various “responsibility jobs,” but it also fosters the concept of working together to achieve smaller, short-term goals.

Set Homework Time for Early Evening.
Instead of immediately doing homework after school, allow some diversion time from the structure of the school day. Kids should be active after school and before dinner.

Choose Fitness-Oriented Gifts.
Items that encourage exercise and adds fun throughout the day, not only builds confidence, but is good incentive for activity. Jump rope, mini-trampoline, tennis rackets, baseball bats and balls, or a membership to the local YMCA builds skills and is a good place to meet friends.

For more information about exercise and nutrition, go to: cdc.gov/nutrition

Susan Keen


Comments

Popular Posts